Paintings

Description of the painting Eugene Delacroix Freedom, leading the people (Freedom on the barricades)


Subsequently, the picture of Eugene Delacroix, written by him in 1830, began to be called "Freedom on the Barricades", but initially it was called "Freedom, leading the people."

Sometimes there was an erroneous opinion that the canvas was created under the influence of the French Revolution, however, in fact, Delacroix devoted the plot to the events of July 1830, when fierce street battles took place in Paris, leading to the overthrow of Charles X, the last of the Bourbons, of which fiercely hated the population of France.

Young Eugene Delacroix, who positioned himself not as a revolutionary, but as a rebel, inspired and intoxicated by the fresh air of freedom and accomplished victories, got the idea to paint a picture of those bloody days and the feat of his people. It took the artist three months to complete the task set by himself, after which the eyes of the delighted public appeared "Freedom leading the people."

The plot of the canvas tells about a fragment of a hot battle, where a detachment of armed rebels through the bodies of their dead comrades and through the whistle of bullets breaks through to the intended target.

In front of everyone, with a tricolor flag of the French Republic raised in one hand and with a gun in the other, is a woman. This is Freedom, which carries people to the attack. She wears a Phrygian cap, characteristic of the Jacobins and a naked chest, which symbolizes the frantic desire of the revolutionaries to go bare chest on royal bayonets.

The painter’s brush flawlessly emphasized the various outfits of the rebels, indicating that representatives of the most diverse sectors of society fought shoulder to shoulder on street barricades. Delacroix is ​​also present in the picture in the image of a man in a top hat to the left of Liberty, despite the fact that he did not take part in street battles.





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Watch the video: Liberty leading the people by the french painter Eugéne delacroix (May 2021).